Twitter and Genealogy Conferences

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A valuable discussion is taking place both over at the Association of Professional Genealogists mailing list (APG-L) as well as among several genealogy bloggers as to whether using Twitter during a presentation at a genealogy conference could constitute a copyright violation – or does it fall within the Fair Use doctrine?

Perhaps what really is needed is a “best practices” for the use of Twitter during genealogy presentations which is in the best interest of all parties – presenters, genealogical conferences, Twitter uses and the genealogy community at large.

We’ve gathered up all the posts so far and even if you don’t use Twitter, you are encouraged to weigh in with your opinion – either by posting at your own genealogy and family history blog or in the comments on this post.

© 2009, copyright Thomas MacEntee

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About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.

4 thoughts on “Twitter and Genealogy Conferences

  1. If you go to a lecture and take notes, are the notes yours or the property of the lecturer? The answer is clearly yours. If a newspaper reporter goes to a lecture or speech, is he bound by some type of speaker copyright to not print a story of the speech and even use direct quotations from the lecturer or speaker? Now if a speaker writes up summary notes, otuline, etc. and hands out, that item is his creation and he has a right to control its republication. Clearly, notes you take at a lecture are your own creation even if dervived from the work presented by the speaker.

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