1930 Denmark Census now available on MyHeritage

The census conducted in Denmark in 1930 is now available on MyHeritage, with full images and a complete index of 3.6 million names

[Editor’s Note: we just received this announcement from MyHeritage, sponsor of GeneaBloggers.com. This is great news!]

We are pleased to let you know that the census conducted in Denmark in 1930 is now available on MyHeritage, with full images and a complete index of 3.6 million names. This is the first time this important collection of historical records has been completely digitized and made available online. It was done as part of a large-scale digitization project by MyHeritage under agreement with the National Danish Archives.

Search the 1930 Denmark Census now

More Information about the 1930 Denmark Census

The 1930 census was conducted in Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands.
The following fields are included and searchable: Given name(s), Surname, Gender, Full birthdate, Residence location, Marital status, Marriage date and Relationship in household. The images contain additional fields such as Birthplace, Occupation, Name and address of the firm or business where employed, and more. In the 1930 census, census workers distributed the booklets and an individual within each household completed the forms.  The handwriting varies greatly between households and in some cases individuals within each household filled in their own information as the handwriting can change between records. View sample image

The 1930 Denmark census will be automatically compared to your family tree and you will receive notifications on Record Matches whenever MyHeritage finds census records relevant to individuals in your family tree.

More Danish Records are on the Way

The 1930 census is the first of many Danish record collections that MyHeritage will release during 2015 and 2016. The total data set will include approx. 120 million names, and will include Danish census records from 1787 to 1930 and Danish Parish records from 1646 to 1915. Most people with ancestors from Denmark will be able to find them in this data set, more than once, and learn more about their life stories and relatives. Many family history mysteries will be solved and new leads will be found. People with Danish roots will be able to trace back their ancestors many centuries back. Next on our list: the Danish censuses of 1880 and 1890. We are currently digitizing them and will bring them online on MyHeritage very soon.

We are committed to digitizing important historical records that have never been digitized before, for the benefit of genealogists and family history fans. We hope the 1930 Denmark Census will be useful for your research and help you make many exciting discoveries.

Search the 1930 Denmark Census now

Genealogy Do-Over – Week 8: 20-26 February 2015

The Genealogy Do-Over - Week 8 Topics: 1) Conducting Collateral Research and 2) Reviewing Offline Education Options.

Click here to download this article in PDF format.

Previous topics in the Genealogy Do-Over:

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Topics: 1) Conducting Collateral Research and 2) Reviewing Offline Education Options

How are you doing on your Genealogy Do-Over? Or are you working on a “go-over” review of your own research? This is Week 8 with five more weeks remaining. I realize that many participants are not yet caught up, but one of the nice features of this collaborative learning project is the ability to print the PDF articles for each week and work on them when you are ready.

Don’t forget! When the current Genealogy Do-Over cycle ends, on 3 April 2015, I’ll be restarting with Week 1 on Friday, 4 April 2015.

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Conducting Collateral Research

Many people confuse collateral research with cluster research or they tend to lump them together. For me, collateral research involves the collateral lines connected to your direct line ancestors. Most times this would mean focusing on the relatives of someone who married into the family – the wife or husband’s parents, siblings etc. It also can mean distant cousins along your direct line. Also don’t forget those second and third marriages and step-children.

My definition of Collateral Research: A search for those who are not direct line ancestors, but who are considered part of the same family. These include siblings, half-siblings, in-laws and others through marriage. Example: take time to look at the siblings of a woman’s husband or her husband’s parents and who they married, as well as their children.

  1. Start out with a direct line ancestor.
  2. Spend time researching that person’s spouse, including parents and siblings.
  3. Record as much information as possible, no matter how insignificant it may seem. Include occupation, address and other details.
  4. If needed, branch out with research on the siblings and other non-direct relatives.
  • What I Plan to Do: Now that I’ve done basic research on my generation, my parents and my grandparents, I’ll go back and start collateral research. This means looking at my siblings (my brother) and proving his life events. Then I’ll work up to my father and my mother (Mom had 11 siblings – a huge project). For each of them I’ll try to prove their live events and list their children.
  • “All-In” Participant Options: While some researchers prefer to work on an entire family as a “group,” meaning parents and children, others “loop back” once they’ve work on all the parents and grandparents. No matter which approach you take, remember to utilize the research and evidence evaluation skills you’ve acquired over the past few weeks of the Genealogy Do-Over.
  • Modified Participant Options: Those doing a “go-over” will want to review the children for each set of parents and look for missing children, other spouses, and verify all information such as birth dates, locations, marriages, etc.

Reviewing Offline Education Options

You’ve likely heard the term “not everything can be found online” when it comes to records and genealogy research. The same holds true for genealogy education. There are several large genealogy conferences as well as week-long intensives better known as “institutes” offering a chance to learn from nationally known educators and genealogists.

Over the past five years, several new institutes have popped up and I believe this will continue over the next few years in the genealogy field. Genealogists realize the value of working in a collaborative environment with other researchers and also being able to network with others in person. There are some aspects of the institute concept that just can’t be replicated online!

Review the list of large genealogy conferences and institutes in the United States and make plans to attend one or more in 2015 or 2016. Click here for RESOURCE Offline Genealogy Education – US or visit the Files section of the Genealogy Do-Over Facebook Group for a listing with links.

  • What I Plan to Do: I currently keep tabs on all genealogy education offerings, both virtual and offline (in person) through various blogs and using Google Alerts. One of the challenges for me, personally, is that when I attend a genealogy conference I am often delivering several lectures. This means I am often unable to attend other lectures at an event. Participating in virtual genealogy education has always been a better fit for me.
  • “All-In” Participant Options: Review the list of available conference and institutes. Also consider local genealogy conferences and attending local genealogy society meetings.
  • Modified Participant Options: Review the list of available conference and institutes. Also consider local genealogy conferences and attending local genealogy society meetings.

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And that’s all I have for this week’s topic of the Genealogy Do-Over. Get ready for next week when we start looking at the importance of “cluster research” especially when trying to break through brick walls. We’ll also focus on keeping documents and photos organized.

Next Week: Week 9 – 26 February – 5 March 2015

  • Conducting Cluster Research
  • Organizing Research Materials – Documents and Photos

Thanks for being a part of the Genealogy Do-Over and your feedback is always appreciated. You can leave a comment on the blog post at GeneaBloggers, email me at geneabloggers@gmail.com or post at the Genealogy Do-Over Facebook Group.

©2015, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.

Millions of Scandinavian records online at MyHeritage SuperSearch

MyHeritage

MyHeritage is delighted to announce that it has digitized millions of exclusive historical records from Scandinavia.

[Editor’s note: This announcement text was taken from the MyHeritage blog announcement here. Used by permission.]

We’re delighted to announce that we have started making good on our promise to digitize and bring online millions of exclusive historical records from Scandinavia. The majority of these records have never been indexed online before.

The records are searchable on MyHeritage SuperSearch and MyHeritage users will now automatically receive matches to those records relevant to their family tree.

Anyone with Scandinavian roots will be able to explore their family history and learn more about the lives of their ancestors with this robust searchable index of records published online for the first time.
The new collections include:

Danish Records:

As we announced in December, MyHeritage has entered into an agreement with the National Archives of Denmark to digitize and index over 120 million records, including all available Danish census records from 1787-1930 and Parish records from 1646 to 1915. As of today the entire 1930 Danish census (3.5 million records) is available online! The remaining censuses and Parish records will be released during 2015 and 2016.

The 1930 Danish census  is a treasure trove of historical information, for anyone whose families originated in the region. It covers Denmark as well as Greenland and the Faroe Islands.

Swedish Household Examination Rolls, 1880-1920:

The household examination rolls are the primary register of the Swedish church, listing the residents of each parish, their families, and important life events such as births, marriages and deaths. The collection includes 54 million records with 5 million color images of which 22 million records are already available online. The remaining records are scheduled to go online before the end of June 2015.

Below is a map of Sweden showing those counties in bold orange whose records have been added today. Here’s some notes about the map:

  • Västra Götaland:  In 1997 this county was formed by merging the three counties of Göteborg och Bohus, Älvsborg, and Skaraborg.
  • Dalarna: In 1997 this county was renamed from Kopparberg.
  • Skåne: In 1997 this county was formed by merging the two counties of Kristianstad and Malmöhus.

About MyHeritage

MyHeritage is the leading destination for discovering, preserving and sharing family history. As technology thought leaders and innovators, MyHeritage is transforming family history into an activity that’s accessible and instantly rewarding. Trusted by millions of families, its global user community enjoys access to a massive library of historical records, the most internationally diverse collection of family trees and ground-breaking search, matching and Instant Discovery technologies. MyHeritage empowers families with an easy way to share their story, past and present, and treasure it for generations to come. MyHeritage is available in 40 languages. www.myheritage.com