500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips – 2015 Edition Now Available in PDF

Thomas MacEntee's latest best-selling ebook - 500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips - 2015 Edition - is now available in PDF from Legacy Family Tree.

My latest ebook – 500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips – 2015 Edition – is now available in PDF format from Legacy Family Tree! And to celebrate, Legacy has created a special coupon for my fans and followers! Click here and use promo code 500best10 to get 10% off your copy today! This coupon is good through Sunday 15 March 2015.

500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips was released on 25 November 2014 as an Amazon Kindle ebook (click here if you want to buy the Kindle version). It has frequently been on the Amazon best-seller lists in the genealogy category and has helped many genealogists with their research.

More About 500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips

500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips could best be described as a “brain dump” of me, Thomas MacEntee, and my many years of knowledge about genealogy and family history. Basically what I’ve done is to extract my favorite tips and tricks from over 85 presentations, 10 books and numerous articles. In addition, I’ve reviewed the social media posts and conversations from Facebook, Twitter and other platforms to highlight those issues most important to today’s genealogists.

What will you find in this “best tips” guide? Everything from practical ways to use Google, advice on protecting your privacy online, information about secret or little known resources for genealogy research, and more. The best way to use this guide is to browse the Table of Contents to find a topic of interest. Also simply search the book when trying to find a solution to a problem, such as how to cite a source or locate an app to generate bibliographic information.

500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips covers a wide range of topics including:

  • genealogy research methodology and strategy
  • how to use websites such as Google and Internet Archive to find your ancestors
  • realizing the power of Facebook, Evernote and Pinterest for genealogy
    preserving family photos and stories
  • staying safe using social media
  • how to secure your genealogy data on your computer and in the cloud
  • and more!

©2015, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

1930 Denmark Census now available on MyHeritage

The census conducted in Denmark in 1930 is now available on MyHeritage, with full images and a complete index of 3.6 million names

[Editor’s Note: we just received this announcement from MyHeritage, sponsor of GeneaBloggers.com. This is great news!]

We are pleased to let you know that the census conducted in Denmark in 1930 is now available on MyHeritage, with full images and a complete index of 3.6 million names. This is the first time this important collection of historical records has been completely digitized and made available online. It was done as part of a large-scale digitization project by MyHeritage under agreement with the National Danish Archives.

Search the 1930 Denmark Census now

More Information about the 1930 Denmark Census

The 1930 census was conducted in Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands.
The following fields are included and searchable: Given name(s), Surname, Gender, Full birthdate, Residence location, Marital status, Marriage date and Relationship in household. The images contain additional fields such as Birthplace, Occupation, Name and address of the firm or business where employed, and more. In the 1930 census, census workers distributed the booklets and an individual within each household completed the forms.  The handwriting varies greatly between households and in some cases individuals within each household filled in their own information as the handwriting can change between records. View sample image

The 1930 Denmark census will be automatically compared to your family tree and you will receive notifications on Record Matches whenever MyHeritage finds census records relevant to individuals in your family tree.

More Danish Records are on the Way

The 1930 census is the first of many Danish record collections that MyHeritage will release during 2015 and 2016. The total data set will include approx. 120 million names, and will include Danish census records from 1787 to 1930 and Danish Parish records from 1646 to 1915. Most people with ancestors from Denmark will be able to find them in this data set, more than once, and learn more about their life stories and relatives. Many family history mysteries will be solved and new leads will be found. People with Danish roots will be able to trace back their ancestors many centuries back. Next on our list: the Danish censuses of 1880 and 1890. We are currently digitizing them and will bring them online on MyHeritage very soon.

We are committed to digitizing important historical records that have never been digitized before, for the benefit of genealogists and family history fans. We hope the 1930 Denmark Census will be useful for your research and help you make many exciting discoveries.

Search the 1930 Denmark Census now

Genealogy Do-Over – Week 8: 20-26 February 2015

The Genealogy Do-Over - Week 8 Topics: 1) Conducting Collateral Research and 2) Reviewing Offline Education Options.

Click here to download this article in PDF format.

Previous topics in the Genealogy Do-Over:

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Topics: 1) Conducting Collateral Research and 2) Reviewing Offline Education Options

How are you doing on your Genealogy Do-Over? Or are you working on a “go-over” review of your own research? This is Week 8 with five more weeks remaining. I realize that many participants are not yet caught up, but one of the nice features of this collaborative learning project is the ability to print the PDF articles for each week and work on them when you are ready.

Don’t forget! When the current Genealogy Do-Over cycle ends, on 3 April 2015, I’ll be restarting with Week 1 on Friday, 4 April 2015.

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Conducting Collateral Research

Many people confuse collateral research with cluster research or they tend to lump them together. For me, collateral research involves the collateral lines connected to your direct line ancestors. Most times this would mean focusing on the relatives of someone who married into the family – the wife or husband’s parents, siblings etc. It also can mean distant cousins along your direct line. Also don’t forget those second and third marriages and step-children.

My definition of Collateral Research: A search for those who are not direct line ancestors, but who are considered part of the same family. These include siblings, half-siblings, in-laws and others through marriage. Example: take time to look at the siblings of a woman’s husband or her husband’s parents and who they married, as well as their children.

  1. Start out with a direct line ancestor.
  2. Spend time researching that person’s spouse, including parents and siblings.
  3. Record as much information as possible, no matter how insignificant it may seem. Include occupation, address and other details.
  4. If needed, branch out with research on the siblings and other non-direct relatives.
  • What I Plan to Do: Now that I’ve done basic research on my generation, my parents and my grandparents, I’ll go back and start collateral research. This means looking at my siblings (my brother) and proving his life events. Then I’ll work up to my father and my mother (Mom had 11 siblings – a huge project). For each of them I’ll try to prove their live events and list their children.
  • “All-In” Participant Options: While some researchers prefer to work on an entire family as a “group,” meaning parents and children, others “loop back” once they’ve work on all the parents and grandparents. No matter which approach you take, remember to utilize the research and evidence evaluation skills you’ve acquired over the past few weeks of the Genealogy Do-Over.
  • Modified Participant Options: Those doing a “go-over” will want to review the children for each set of parents and look for missing children, other spouses, and verify all information such as birth dates, locations, marriages, etc.

Reviewing Offline Education Options

You’ve likely heard the term “not everything can be found online” when it comes to records and genealogy research. The same holds true for genealogy education. There are several large genealogy conferences as well as week-long intensives better known as “institutes” offering a chance to learn from nationally known educators and genealogists.

Over the past five years, several new institutes have popped up and I believe this will continue over the next few years in the genealogy field. Genealogists realize the value of working in a collaborative environment with other researchers and also being able to network with others in person. There are some aspects of the institute concept that just can’t be replicated online!

Review the list of large genealogy conferences and institutes in the United States and make plans to attend one or more in 2015 or 2016. Click here for RESOURCE Offline Genealogy Education – US or visit the Files section of the Genealogy Do-Over Facebook Group for a listing with links.

  • What I Plan to Do: I currently keep tabs on all genealogy education offerings, both virtual and offline (in person) through various blogs and using Google Alerts. One of the challenges for me, personally, is that when I attend a genealogy conference I am often delivering several lectures. This means I am often unable to attend other lectures at an event. Participating in virtual genealogy education has always been a better fit for me.
  • “All-In” Participant Options: Review the list of available conference and institutes. Also consider local genealogy conferences and attending local genealogy society meetings.
  • Modified Participant Options: Review the list of available conference and institutes. Also consider local genealogy conferences and attending local genealogy society meetings.

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And that’s all I have for this week’s topic of the Genealogy Do-Over. Get ready for next week when we start looking at the importance of “cluster research” especially when trying to break through brick walls. We’ll also focus on keeping documents and photos organized.

Next Week: Week 9 – 26 February – 5 March 2015

  • Conducting Cluster Research
  • Organizing Research Materials – Documents and Photos

Thanks for being a part of the Genealogy Do-Over and your feedback is always appreciated. You can leave a comment on the blog post at GeneaBloggers, email me at geneabloggers@gmail.com or post at the Genealogy Do-Over Facebook Group.

©2015, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.