Genealogy Blogging Beat – Thursday, 11 February 2016

Feb 11, 1963. Beginning on this date, Julia Child demystified French cooking and entertained viewers as “The French Chef” on WGBH-TV, Boston, MA. The show was a great success in syndication on PBS stations, and Child filmed 200 programs— always with her trade-mark trilling voice and at times slapping around the poultry— signing off with a cheery “Bon appétit!” Child’s show, along with her book Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961, authored with Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle), are credited with awakening Americans to the joy of continental cuisine.

Feb 11, 1963. Beginning on this date, Julia Child demystified French cooking and entertained viewers as “The French Chef” on WGBH-TV, Boston, MA. The show was a great success in syndication on PBS stations, and Child filmed 200 programs— always with her trade-mark trilling voice and at times slapping around the poultry— signing off with a cheery “Bon appétit!” Child’s show, along with her book Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961, authored with Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle), are credited with awakening Americans to the joy of continental cuisine.


Today is Thursday, 11 February 2016, and here is what’s available in terms of genealogy blogging and other related events in the Genealogy Blogging world:

Genealogy Blogging Items of Note

  • Today: Edison Day, “The French Chef ” Television Debut – Anniversary, and White Shirt Day.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Feb 10, 1824. A day to remember Samuel Plimsoll, “the Sailor’s Friend,” a coal merchant turned reformer and politician, who was elected to the British parliament in 1868. He attacked the practice of overloading heavily insured ships, calling them “coffin ships.” His persistence brought about amendment of Britain’s Merchant Shipping Act. The Plimsoll Line, named for him, is a line on the side of ships marking maximum load allowed by law. Born at Bristol, England; died at Folkestone, England, June 3, 1898.

Feb 10, 1824. A day to remember Samuel Plimsoll, “the Sailor’s Friend,” a coal merchant turned reformer and politician, who was elected to the British parliament in 1868. He attacked the practice of overloading heavily insured ships, calling them “coffin ships.” His persistence brought about amendment of Britain’s Merchant Shipping Act. The Plimsoll Line, named for him, is a line on the side of ships marking maximum load allowed by law. Born at Bristol, England; died at Folkestone, England, June 3, 1898.


Today is Wednesday, 10 February 2016, and here is what’s available in terms of genealogy blogging and other related events in the Genealogy World:

Genealogy Blogging Items of Note

  • Today: Ash Wednesday, Plimsoll Day (UK), and Treaty of Paris Ends French and Indian Wars – Anniversary.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Feb 9, 1964. British pop phenomenon The Beatles began the “British Invasion” of America with their appearance on America’s top television variety show. They performed five songs before a screaming studio audience of 728. The estimated viewership for that night’s show was 73 million people— making it the most-viewed US TV program in history up to that time.

Feb 9, 1964. British pop phenomenon The Beatles began the “British Invasion” of America with their appearance on America’s top television variety show. They performed five songs before a screaming studio audience of 728. The estimated viewership for that night’s show was 73 million people— making it the most-viewed US TV program in history up to that time.


Today is Tuesday, 9 February 2016, and here is what’s available in terms of genealogy blogging and other related events in the Genealogy Blogging world:

Genealogy Blogging Items of Note

  • Today: The “Beatles” Appear on the Ed Sullivan Show – Anniversary, International Pancake Day, Mardi Gras, Paczki Day, and Shrove Tuesday.

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