Genealogy Blogging Beat – Sunday, 10 May 2015

Observed first in 1907 at the request of Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia, PA, who asked her church to hold a service in memory of all mothers on the anniversary of her mother’s death. In 1909, two years after her mother’s death, Jarvis and friends began a letter-writing campaign to create a Mother’s Day observance. Congress passed legislation in 1914 designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. Some say the predecessor of Mother’s Day was the ancient spring festival dedicated to mother goddesses: Rhea (Greek) and Cybele (Roman).

Observed first in 1907 at the request of Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia, PA, who asked her church to hold a service in memory of all mothers on the anniversary of her mother’s death. In 1909, two years after her mother’s death, Jarvis and friends began a letter-writing campaign to create a Mother’s Day observance. Congress passed legislation in 1914 designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. Some say the predecessor of Mother’s Day was the ancient spring festival dedicated to mother goddesses: Rhea (Greek) and Cybele (Roman).


Today is Sunday 10 May 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Fred Astaire’s Birthday – Anniversary, Golden Spike Driving – Anniversary, Mother’s Day (US) – Anniversary, and National Police Week begins (US).

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Saturday, 9 May 2015

9 May 1941. During WWII, when a German U-110 submarine attacked a British convoy, two British vessels, the Bulldog and Aubretia, were able to retaliate so quickly with depth charges that the submarine was disabled and unable to dive. With the submarine captured, British sailors investigated the radio room and discovered the typewriter-like Enigma, a ciphering machine that enabled safe German communication, and documents of tables that helped explain how it worked. The U-110’ s capture was kept secret, and British cryptographers used this break to begin unraveling German code during the war.

9 May 1941. During WWII, when a German U-110 submarine attacked a British convoy, two British vessels, the Bulldog and Aubretia, were able to retaliate so quickly with depth charges that the submarine was disabled and unable to dive. With the submarine captured, British sailors investigated the radio room and discovered the typewriter-like Enigma, a ciphering machine that enabled safe German communication, and documents of tables that helped explain how it worked. The U-110’ s capture was kept secret, and British cryptographers used this break to begin unraveling German code during the war.


Today is Saturday, 9 May 2015 and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: British Capture Enigma Machine – Anniversary, John Brown’s Birthday – Anniversary, European Union founded – Anniversary, Jamestown Day, William Moulton Marston’s Birthday – Anniversary, National Babysitters Day, National Moscato Day, and National Train Day.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Friday, 8 May 2015

8 May 1945. Victory in Europe Day commemorates unconditional surrender of Germany to Allied forces. The surrender document was signed by German representatives at General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s headquarters at Reims to become effective, and hostilities to end, at one minute past midnight May 9, 1945, which was 9: 01 PM, EDT, on May 8 in the US. President Harry S Truman on May 8 declared May 9, 1945, to be “V-E Day,” but it later came to be observed on May 8. A separate German surrender to the USSR was signed at Karlshorst, near Berlin, May 8.

8 May 1945. Victory in Europe Day commemorates unconditional surrender of Germany to Allied forces. The surrender document was signed by German representatives at General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s headquarters at Reims to become effective, and hostilities to end, at one minute past midnight May 9, 1945, which was 9: 01 PM, EDT, on May 8 in the US. President Harry S Truman on May 8 declared May 9, 1945, to be “V-E Day,” but it later came to be observed on May 8. A separate German surrender to the USSR was signed at Karlshorst, near Berlin, May 8.


Today is Friday, 8 May 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Martin Z. Mollusk Day, Military Spouse Appreciation Day (US),
    National Day of Prayer (US), Harry S. Truman’s Birthday – Anniversary, and V-E Day – 70th Anniversary.

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