Genealogy Blogging Beat – Wednesday, 24 June 2015

June 24, 1948. In the early days of the Cold War the Soviet Union challenged the West’s right of access to Berlin. The Soviets created a blockade, and an airlift to supply some 2,250,000 people resulted. The airlift lasted a total of 321 days and brought into Berlin 1,592,787 tons of supplies. Joseph Stalin finally backed down and the blockade ended May 12, 1949.

June 24, 1948. In the early days of the Cold War the Soviet Union challenged the West’s right of access to Berlin. The Soviets created a blockade, and an airlift to supply some 2,250,000 people resulted. The airlift lasted a total of 321 days and brought into Berlin 1,592,787 tons of supplies. Joseph Stalin finally backed down and the blockade ended May 12, 1949.


Today is Wednesday, 24 June 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Battle of Bannockburn – Anniversary, Henry Ward Beecher’s Birthday – Anniversary, Berlin Airlift – Anniversary, Feast of Saint John the Baptist, and Gustavus Swift’s Birthday – Anniversary.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Tuesday, 23 June 2015

On June 23, 1868, the first US typewriter was patented by Luther Sholes.

On June 23, 1868, the first US typewriter was patented by Luther Sholes.


Today is Tuesday, 23 June 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: First typewriter patented – Anniversary, Bob Fosse’s Birthday – Anniversary, Last Formal Surrender of Confederate Troops – Anniversary, and Alan Turing’s Birthday – Anniversary.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Monday, 22 June 2015

June 22, 1940. WWII’s Battle of France, which began May 12 with German forces crossing into the nation at Sedan and the Meuse River, reached its conclusion with France surrendering. Previously, the British Expeditionary Force had evaculated via Dunkirk on May 27 to June 4, and Paris had been declared an open city on June 13. On June 22, France and Germany signed a second armistice agreement at the Compiègne Forest— the same location as the 1918 armistice of WWI. Adolf Hitler made a point of signing the 1940 compact in the same railway carriage as the 1918 document.

June 22, 1940. WWII’s Battle of France, which began May 12 with German forces crossing into the nation at Sedan and the Meuse River, reached its conclusion with France surrendering. Previously, the British Expeditionary Force had evaculated via Dunkirk on May 27 to June 4, and Paris had been declared an open city on June 13. On June 22, France and Germany signed a second armistice agreement at the Compiègne Forest— the same location as the 1918 armistice of WWI. Adolf Hitler made a point of signing the 1940 compact in the same railway carriage as the 1918 document.


Today is Monday, 22 June 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Fall of France – 75th Anniversary, Joe Lewis v. Max Schmeling Fight – Anniversary, and Soviet Union invaded during WWII – Anniversary.

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