Genealogy Blogging Beat – Friday, 15 May 2015

On 15 May 1940, nylon hose went on sale at stores throughout the country. Competing producers bought their nylon yarn from E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (later DuPont). W.H. Carothers, of DuPont, developed nylon, called “Polymer 66,” in 1935. It was the first totally man-made fiber and over time was substituted for other materials and came to have widespread application.

On 15 May 1940, nylon hose went on sale at stores throughout the country. Competing producers bought their nylon yarn from E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (later DuPont). W.H. Carothers, of DuPont, developed nylon, called “Polymer 66,” in 1935. It was the first totally man-made fiber and over time was substituted for other materials and came to have widespread application.


Today is Friday, 15 May 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: L. Frank Baum’s Birthday – Anniversary, First Flight Attendant – 85th Anniversary, National Bike to Work Day, Nylon Stockings – 75th Anniversary, and Peace Officer Memorial Day (US).

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Thursday, 14 May 2015

14 May 1796. In the 18th century smallpox was a widespread and often fatal disease. Edward Jenner, a physician in rural England, heard reports of dairy farmers who apparently became immune to smallpox as a result of exposure to cowpox, a related but milder disease. After two decades of studying the phenomenon, Jenner injected cowpox into a healthy eight-year-old boy, who subsequently developed cowpox. Six weeks later, Jenner inoculated the boy with smallpox. He remained healthy. Jenner called this new procedure vaccination, from vaccinia, another term for cowpox. Within 18 months, 12,000 people in England had been vaccinated and the number of smallpox deaths dropped by two-thirds.

14 May 1796. In the 18th century smallpox was a widespread and often fatal disease. Edward Jenner, a physician in rural England, heard reports of dairy farmers who apparently became immune to smallpox as a result of exposure to cowpox, a related but milder disease. After two decades of studying the phenomenon, Jenner injected cowpox into a healthy eight-year-old boy, who subsequently developed cowpox. Six weeks later, Jenner inoculated the boy with smallpox. He remained healthy. Jenner called this new procedure vaccination, from vaccinia, another term for cowpox. Within 18 months, 12,000 people in England had been vaccinated and the number of smallpox deaths dropped by two-thirds.


Today is Thursday, 14 May 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Ascension Day, Buddha’s Birthday, Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit’s Birthday – Anniversary, Smallpox Vaccine Discovered – Anniversary, Stars and Stripes Forever Day, and Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps founded – Anniversary.

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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Wednesday, 13 May 2015

13 May 1914. World heavyweight boxing champion, 1937– 49, nicknamed the “Brown Bomber,” Joseph Louis Barrow was born near Lafayette, AL. He died 12 April 1981, at Las Vegas, NV. Buried at Arlington National Cemetery. (Louis’s burial there, by presidential waiver, was the 39th exception ever to the eligibility rules for burial in Arlington National Cemetery.)

13 May 1914. World heavyweight boxing champion, 1937– 49, nicknamed the “Brown Bomber,” Joseph Louis Barrow was born near Lafayette, AL. He died 12 April 1981, at Las Vegas, NV. Buried at Arlington National Cemetery. (Louis’s burial there, by presidential waiver, was the 39th exception ever to the eligibility rules for burial in Arlington National Cemetery.)


Today is Wednesday, 13 May 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Joe Louis’ Birthday – Anniversary, Mexican War Declared – Anniversary, and Saint Lawrence Seaway Act – Anniversary.

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