May I Introduce To You . . . Charles Purvis

Charles Purvis

I have the pleasure of introducing you to, Charles Purvis and his blog, Carolina Family Roots, described as, “. . . Researching and documenting the history of families on my surname page; networking with cousins to factually document our family history.”

How Charles Got Started in Genealogy

“Two things, I had just completed reading Alex Haley’s, ‘Roots’ and I had been transferred from Halloman Air Force Base, Alamogordo, New Mexico to Hill Air Force Base,Ogden,Utah.Ogden is approximately 35 miles North of Salt Lake City. I started researching my family history in October 1976.

The current LDS Library had not been built at this time and the Library was in the Joseph Smith Building east of Temple Square. I watched the current Library as it was built.

Charles’ Thoughts on Creating a Blog

“I started my blog in January 2012. Back in 1995 while living in UtahI created and maintained a webpage on line called ‘CarolinaRoots’ that was very successful. It stayed on line until Geocities shut down their website. Now it can be found in the archives.”

Charles’ Tips for New Genealogy Bloggers

“Since I’m new myself I think it would presumptuous to offer up advice at this time.”

Charles’ Favorite Ancestor

“Thomas Davis, my 4th great Grandfather on my paternal side of the family. He served his country and helped to build America.”

How Genealogy Improved Charles’ Life

“I have gained a real appreciation of the sacrifices and difficulties my ancestors endued to make a better life for their children and grandchildren.”

What Charles’ Loves Most About Genealogy

Charles loves helping others, “I have been helped throughout the past 36 years. I love genealogy. Genealogy is fun; it is not so easy anyone can do it. Research is tedious and time-consuming; it is not easy and it can be costly if done properly. If you think you can do your genealogy sitting behind a computer at home don’t waste your time starting the process. Genealogy is done in the dusty basements of courthouses, archives, libraries and repositories throughout the world.”

Charles’ Time Capsule Message

“If you decide to do your family histories honor your ancestors by doing it properly; follow the Genealogical Proof Standard. If you are committed to researching your family, I highly recommend that you read Val Greenwood’s Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy before starting any research effort.

To me the most important element of genealogy is a factually formatted source for every documented fact.  Without this your life work will be rendered useless and become a work of fiction.

I abhor the junk genealogy found posted all over the internet and those who had time to copy other peoples research buy don’t have the time to take their names and give them credit.

I would like to see the day when every genealogical society supported the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) and the GPS was incorporated into their bylaws.

I would further like to see the day when the first session or two of every new genealogy class started with the GPS and Chapter 2 of Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Evidence Explained.

Charlie Purvis, E-9 USAF Retired; Retired , Aircraft Engine Manufacturer;  Bachelor in Business Administration, Park College; Masters-Human Resource Administration, Utah State University, Logan, Utah;  Member Chesterfield District Chapter, South Carolina Genealogical Society; National Genealogical Society.”

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Please take a moment and head on over to Charles’ blog. Leave him a message to let him know you stopped by. Welcome Charles, it’s great to have you here!

© 2012, copyright Gini Webb

Gini Webb lives in San Diego, California and manages her own blog, Ginisology, while also researching her own German heritage, recently retired, enjoying life with wonderful husband Steve and visiting with her now seven grandchildren!

Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Gini Webb via e-mail.

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