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Genealogy Blogging Beat – Saturday, 11 March 2017

On 11 March 1918, the first cases of the “Spanish” influenza were reported in the US when 107 soldiers became sick at Fort Riley, KS. By the end of 1920 nearly 25 percent of the US population had been infected. As many as 500,000 civilians died from the virus, exceeding the number of US troops killed abroad in WWI. Worldwide, more than 1 percent of the global population, or 22 million people, had died by 1920 because of the virus. The origin of the virus was never determined absolutely, though it was probably somewhere in Asia. The name “Spanish” influenza came from the relatively high number of cases in that country early in the epidemic. Due to the panic, cancellation of public events was common, and many public service workers wore masks on the job. Emergency tent hospitals were set up in some locations due to overcrowding.

On 11 March 1918, the first cases of the “Spanish” influenza were reported in the US when 107 soldiers became sick at Fort Riley, KS. By the end of 1920 nearly 25 percent of the US population had been infected. As many as 500,000 civilians died from the virus, exceeding the number of US troops killed abroad in WWI. Worldwide, more than 1 percent of the global population, or 22 million people, had died by 1920 because of the virus. The origin of the virus was never determined absolutely, though it was probably somewhere in Asia. The name “Spanish” influenza came from the relatively high number of cases in that country early in the epidemic. Due to the panic, cancellation of public events was common, and many public service workers wore masks on the job. Emergency tent hospitals were set up in some locations due to overcrowding.
On 11 March 1918, the first cases of the “Spanish” influenza were reported in the US when 107 soldiers became sick at Fort Riley, KS. By the end of 1920 nearly 25 percent of the US population had been infected. As many as 500,000 civilians died from the virus, exceeding the number of US troops killed abroad in WWI. Worldwide, more than 1 percent of the global population, or 22 million people, had died by 1920 because of the virus. The origin of the virus was never determined absolutely, though it was probably somewhere in Asia. The name “Spanish” influenza came from the relatively high number of cases in that country early in the epidemic. Due to the panic, cancellation of public events was common, and many public service workers wore masks on the job. Emergency tent hospitals were set up in some locations due to overcrowding.

Today is Saturday, 11 March 2017 and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the Genealogy Blogging world:

Genealogy Items of Note

  • Today: Johnny Appleseed Day, Genealogy Day, Lawrence Welk Birthday – Anniversary, and Spanish Flu epidemic begins – Anniversary.

Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month

Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of  The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.

March 11 — Did you have any female ancestors who died young or from tragic or unexpected circumstances? Describe and how did this affect the family?


Daily Blogging Prompts

Many genealogy and family history bloggers like to post to their blogs every day, but at times are at a loss for ideas. Take your inspiration from today’s Daily Blogging Prompts below – click on each prompt for a description. Prompts are a great way to create new content and you can participate in a community effort with other genealogy bloggers.

© 2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.


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