Genealogy Bargains for Monday 27 February 2017

FREE WEBINAR - Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America presented by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG - Wednesday, March 1st, 1:00pm Central - “It is frequently assumed that the only enslaved Americans were those brought on the slave ships from Africa. Yet, an estimated one-half of early immigrants came to America as apprentices, indentured servants, and redemptioners. And, a good many of those were children.”

UPDATED GENEALOGY BARGAINS for Monday, February 27, 2017

INDEX of Genealogy Bargains

Click link to jump to that section . . .

NEW Genealogy Bargains

FREE WEBINAR - Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America presented by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG - Wednesday, March 1st, 1:00pm Central - “It is frequently assumed that the only enslaved Americans were those brought on the slave ships from Africa. Yet, an estimated one-half of early immigrants came to America as apprentices, indentured servants, and redemptioners. And, a good many of those were children.”

  • NEW! FREE WEBINAR – Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America presented by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG – Wednesday, March 1st, 1:00pm Central – “It is frequently assumed that the only enslaved Americans were those brought on the slave ships from Africa. Yet, an estimated one-half of early immigrants came to America as apprentices, indentured servants, and redemptioners. And, a good many of those were children.” Click here to register – via Legacy Family Tree Webinars

Click here to return to list of sales

ONGOING Genealogy Bargains

FREE RECORDING! Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing presented by Diahan Southard - “Do you have an adoption in your line, or are you adopted yourself? Do you have an ancestor who just refuses to be found? DNA testing can be a very powerful tool to help fill in the blanks in your family tree. But how helpful can it really be when you know absolutely nothing about the person you are trying to find? As it turns out, with the right techniques and a careful search, your DNA might be able to tell you more than you think.”

  • FREE RECORDING! Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing presented by Diahan Southard – “Do you have an adoption in your line, or are you adopted yourself? Do you have an ancestor who just refuses to be found? DNA testing can be a very powerful tool to help fill in the blanks in your family tree. But how helpful can it really be when you know absolutely nothing about the person you are trying to find? As it turns out, with the right techniques and a careful search, your DNA might be able to tell you more than you think.” Click here to view for free through Tuesday, February 28th – via Legacy Family Tree Webinars

Click here to return to list of sales

The Complete Guide to Google Photos: The Fantastic Free Tool for Curating Past and Present Pictures

Click here to return to list of sales

The Write Stuff - Genealogy educator & author Lisa A. Alzo announces her successful online classes for genealogists seeking to improve their writing skills.

  • EXPIRES SOON! Save over 30% on The Write Stuff – and improve your family history writing skills. For the past three years, genealogy educator and author Lisa A. Alzo has been conducting successful online classes for genealogists seeking to improve their writing skills. Her course – The Write Stuff – is now available in a self-paced format at a savings of 30%. Regularly $129, you can now get this course for just $89 – use promo code FRUGALGEN at checkout – this offer is good through February 28th. Click here for more information.

Click here to return to list of sales

FamilySearch is offering an amazing opportunity - to attend a British Isles Research Seminar, in person OR online, March 13-17, 2017

Click here to return to list of sales

FREE ACCESS Black History collection at fold3 - “Throughout U.S. History, African Americans have played an integral part in the development and achievement of this country. Fold3 is now revealing a side of the African American story that few have seen before. View more than a million rare photos and documents.”

  • EXPIRES SOON! FREE ACCESS Black History collection at fold3 – “Throughout U.S. History, African Americans have played an integral part in the development and achievement of this country. Fold3 is now revealing a side of the African American story that few have seen before. View more than a million rare photos and documents.”  Click here to access – via fold3

Click here to return to list of saless

Disclaimer

All prices and offers are subject to change. Some items may be sold out and have limited inventory. Also check to see if you have automated purchase settings enabled, such as Amazon Buy with 1-Click: it is your responsibility to make sure you are getting the correct price for an item before you check out and finalize the transaction.

Disclosure statement: I have material connections with various vendors and organizations. To review the material connections I have in the genealogy industry, please see Disclosure Statement.

Follow Us on Pinterest

All new deals are posted to Pinterest – follow us there!
Follow GeneaBloggers’s board Genealogy Bargains on Pinterest.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.

Genealogy Blogging Beat – Monday 27 February 2017

On 27 February 1897, opera singer Marian Anderson was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Anderson’s talent was evident at an early age. Her career stonewalled by the prejudice she encountered in the US, she moved to Europe, where the magnificence of her voice and her versatility as a performer began to establish her as one of the world’s finest contraltos. Preventing Anderson’s performance at Washington’s Constitution Hall in 1939 on the basis of her color, the Daughters of the American Revolution unintentionally secured for her the publicity that would lay the foundation for her success in the States. Her performance was rescheduled, and on 9 April 1939 (Easter Sunday), 75,000 people showed up to hear her sing from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The performance was simultaneously broadcast by radio. In 1955 Anderson became the first African American to perform with the New York Metropolitan Opera. The following year President Dwight Eisenhower named her a delegate to the United Nations. She performed at President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration and in 1963 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Anderson died 8 April 1993, at Portland, Oregon.

On 27 February 1897, opera singer Marian Anderson was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Anderson’s talent was evident at an early age. Her career stonewalled by the prejudice she encountered in the US, she moved to Europe, where the magnificence of her voice and her versatility as a performer began to establish her as one of the world’s finest contraltos. Preventing Anderson’s performance at Washington’s Constitution Hall in 1939 on the basis of her color, the Daughters of the American Revolution unintentionally secured for her the publicity that would lay the foundation for her success in the States. Her performance was rescheduled, and on 9 April 1939 (Easter Sunday), 75,000 people showed up to hear her sing from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The performance was simultaneously broadcast by radio. In 1955 Anderson became the first African American to perform with the New York Metropolitan Opera. The following year President Dwight Eisenhower named her a delegate to the United Nations. She performed at President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration and in 1963 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Anderson died 8 April 1993, at Portland, Oregon.


Today is Monday, 27 February 2017, and here is what’s available in terms of genealogy blogging and other related events in the Genealogy Blogging world:

Genealogy Blogging Items of Note

  • Today: African Burial Ground National Monument Established – Anniversary, Marian Anderson’s Birthday – Anniversary, 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution Ratified, and Elizabeth Taylor’s Birthday – Anniversar

Continue reading

Genealogy Blogging Beat – Sunday 26 February 2017

On 26 February 1932, the iconic country music star Johnny Cash was born J.R. Cash at Kingsland, Arkansas. His career spanned the 1950s through the year he died, and he recorded more than 1,500 songs, including such hits as “I Walk the Line,” “Ring of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues” and “A Boy Named Sue.” He was called “the Man in Black” because he wore a black long-tailed suit in sympathy for those who suffered. The recipient of numerous awards and honors, Cash died at Nashville, TN, on 12 September 2003.

On 26 February 1932, the iconic country music star Johnny Cash was born J.R. Cash at Kingsland, Arkansas. His career spanned the 1950s through the year he died, and he recorded more than 1,500 songs, including such hits as “I Walk the Line,” “Ring of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues” and “A Boy Named Sue.” He was called “the Man in Black” because he wore a black long-tailed suit in sympathy for those who suffered. The recipient of numerous awards and honors, Cash died at Nashville, TN, on 12 September 2003.


Today is Sunday, 26 February 2017, and here is what’s available in terms of genealogy blogging and other related events in the Genealogy Blogging world:

Genealogy Blogging Items of Note

  • Today: Academy Awards, Johnny Cash’s Birthday – Anniversary, Grand Canyon National Park Established – Anniversary, and World Trade Center Bombing of 1993 – Anniversary.

Continue reading