Announces New Home for MyCanvas

Ancestry Saves MyCanvas

Early this morning, Eric Shoup – Executive Vice President for Product at – announced that Ancestry would continue providing access to the popular genealogy self-publishing platform MyCanvas. This is good news to the many MyCanvas users who have been busy downloading content since Ancestry’s initial announcement on 5 June 2014 that it was shutting down MyCanvas along with other non-performing platforms.

According to Shoup’s post at the blog, the functions of MyCanvas will be assumed by Alexander’s, a Utah-based printing company which has been a long-time service provider for the MyCanvas product line.

Shoup notes that the transition over to Alexander’s will take about six months and current access to MyCanvas will be extended beyond the 30 September 2014 shutdown date originally announced. Once the transition is final, the entry point for MyCanvas will be at the Alexander’s sites.

One other issue related to MyCanvas that has been a frequent concern to users: the inability to ship products to Canada. According to Lorine McGinnis Schulze of the Olive Tree Genealogy Blog, Alexander’s will extend shipping of MyCanvas products to Canadian residents.

Stay tuned here at GeneaBloggers for further developments related to MyCanvas and other products and services.

©2014, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.

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About Thomas MacEntee

What happens when a “tech guy” with a love for history gets laid off during The Great Recession of 2008? You get Thomas MacEntee, a genealogy professional who’s also a blogger, educator, author, social media connector, online community builder and more. Thomas was laid off after a 25-year career in the information technology field, so he started his own genealogy-related business called High Definition Genealogy. He also created an online community of over 3,000 family history bloggers known as GeneaBloggers. His most recent endeavor, Hack Genealogy, is an attempt to “re-purpose today’s technology for tomorrow’s genealogy.” Thomas describes himself as a lifelong learner with a background in a multitude of topics who has finally figured out what he does best: teach, inspire, instigate, and serve as a curator and go-to-guy for concept nurturing and inspiration. Thomas is a big believer in success, and that we all succeed when we help each other find success.