Genealogy Blogging Beat – Sunday, November 27, 2011

genealogy blogging beat

Today is Sunday, November 27, 2011 and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today is the First Sunday of Advent.

Daily Blogging Prompts

Black Sheep Sunday – create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.” Bring out your ne’er-do-wells, your cads, your black widows, your horse thieves and tell their stories. And don’t forget to check out the International Black Sheep Society of Genealogists (IBSSG). This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Church Record Sunday – describe a specific church record or a set of records held by a church or denomination and how they can assist genealogists. This is an ongoing series developed by Gena Philibert Ortega at Gena’s Genealogy.

Sentimental Sunday – discuss a sentimental story or memory about an ancestor, or maybe even a family tradition that touches you. This is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers and was suggested by Renate Sanders at Into the Light.

Sunday’s Obituary – if you have obituaries of family members and ancestors, consider posting them along with other information about that person as part of Sunday’s Obituary. This is an ongoing series developed by Leslie Ann at Ancestors Live Here.

To ensure that your blog post is included in the “roll-up” widgets above, include the name of the blogging theme in your post title. Examples: Black Sheep Sunday – Crystal DeCanter; Tombstone Tuesday – Emma Grate.

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If you would like your event or Daily Blogging Prompt included, please contact Geneabloggers at geneabloggers [at] gmail [dot] com.

©2011, copyright Thomas MacEntee

Thanksgiving – 52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History

52 Weeks Personal Genealogy and History

Week #48 – Thanksgiving

Week 48. Thanksgiving. What was on your family’s Thanksgiving table? Do you serve the same dishes now as your family served in the past?

This challenge runs from Saturday, November 26, 2011 through Friday, December 2, 2011.

Here are the latest posts from GeneaBloggers members on this week’s challenge:

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52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History by Amy Coffin is a series of weekly blogging prompts (one for each week of 2011) that invite genealogists and others to record memories and insights about their own lives for future descendants. You do not have to be a blogger to participate. If you do not have a genealogy blog, write down your memories on your computer, or simply record them on paper and keep them with your files.

© 2011, copyright Thomas MacEntee

New Genealogy Blogs November 26, 2011

new genealogy blogs

There are 4 newly-discovered genealogy and family-history related blogs that we’ve located this week. Remember to try and help out these new blogs by:

  • using any follow feature listed on the blog
  • adding them to your blog reader
  • adding a comment on their blog saying “hi” and “welcome”

Here are this week’s new listings:

breaking down brick walls

Breaking Down Brick Walls
http://breakingdownbrickwalls.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

I’ve been considering blogging as a way to resolve my family history brick walls for several years. In fact, I created this blog in 2006 or 2007, I think. Unfortunately, family circumstances didn’t permit me to spend time on blogging.

When time became available, I debated about the blog again. At that time, my concerns were more practical — privacy. Since this impacts my brother and his family as well as me, I was concerned that I’d be “giving too much away” if I blogged about my grandparents.

Fast forward a few years, I’ve decided that talking about my grandparents isn’t likely to cause irreparable harm. They’re all deceased (as of 1997), and my parents are both deceased, too.

I’ve decided to concentrate on my mother’s family. In particular, I’m going to try and work through the brick walls of her father’s family. I’ve chosen this side of my family in part because I’ve worked them back the farthest, and in part because it’s the only part of my family that allegedly arrived before the Revolution.

cas bezi

Čas běží… seriózně i neformálně o historii a genealogii
http://casobeh.blogspot.com
Blog type: Czech genealogy

Translated from Czech via Google Translate: My view of the genealogy

A few years ago I saw two in the archives Dědoušky. Enthusiasm for research of them just shone, and, as it is at that age, could quarrel with the blood of stupidity. Probably had some behind the genealogy course, and so what moment one another admonished: “You have to underline in red, green, do not take it!” … They were magical, apparently consistent and leave descendants beautifully colored embarrassed list of names and dates of ancestors. But in fact the main contribution of genealogical search see.

For the genealogy is sometimes used Czech word “genealogy” is a description of the genus. That’s what it is – only the names and dates, but mostly about people who were our ancestors. How they lived, what happened? They were industrious, gotten an asset or a happily obtained the miserable end? What they left behind?

This is all I’m looking for. Every event that I can find and assign it to a specific person from the dry science becomes a living source of someone’s private history. The spring that leave dead ancestors long forgotten in the depths of the past tense.

origin hunters

Origin Hunters
http://originhunters.blogspot.com
Blog type: Individual family history

At Origin Hunters we are passionate about genealogy research and every ancestor hunt is exciting. Every day we ask – “Where did you come from?”

Northboro – Worcester – Boston, Covering Genealogy in New England

Cael is the nickname given to me by my godfather when I was young. We were all given nicknames – like snake or rabbit or snodgrass – but those are stories for a different time.

Genealogist, Technologist, Futurist

village life

Village Life in Kreis Saarburg, Germany
http://19thcenturyrhinelandlive.blogspot.com
Blog type: German genealogy, Individual family history

My ancestors who came from the small towns of Irsch, Oberzerf and Serrig in Kreis Saarburg, Rhineland, were peasant farmers or craftsmen. In the mid-19th century they left these villages and immigrated to the woodlands of Calumet County, Wisconsin to search for a better life. By means of this blog, take the opportunity to look into their houses, explore their villages, understand their daily labors and customs, and see how the lure of a new life in America called to them.

I am a librarian writing a history about my Rhineland ancestors. I want it to be filled with the details of their daily lives in Germany and later in Wisconsin. I am drawing from genealogical research, from notes taken at workshops, from historical plaques and markers, from conversations, e-mails, and the internet, but especially from local histories written in German which have been accumulated on several trips to Germany. While I love historical research, I do not love organizing my materials. This blog offers one way to keep track of the most pertinent information and to make it useful to other people as well. These posts are copyrighted by the author.

© 2011, copyright Thomas MacEntee