Genealogy Blogging Beat – Tuesday, 21 April 2015

Apr 21– May 4, 1865. After President Abraham Lincoln’s death and a Washington, DC, funeral, a special train was used to transport the body to its final resting place at Springfield, IL. An un-utilized train called The United States, which had been built for presidential travel, was transformed into a nine-car funeral train. On Apr 21, 1865, with the President’s portrait fastened on the front of the engine, “The Lincoln Special” began its 1,654-mile journey through 444 communities in seven states from Washington to Springfield. Millions of people came out over two weeks to see the passing funeral train. At a dozen scheduled stops, the coffin was transported by horse-drawn hearse to public buildings, including Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where Lincoln lay in state and mourners waited for up to five hours to pass by the closed coffin. Lincoln was buried on May 4.

Apr 21– May 4, 1865. After President Abraham Lincoln’s death and a Washington, DC, funeral, a special train was used to transport the body to its final resting place at Springfield, IL. An un-utilized train called The United States, which had been built for presidential travel, was transformed into a nine-car funeral train. On Apr 21, 1865, with the President’s portrait fastened on the front of the engine, “The Lincoln Special” began its 1,654-mile journey through 444 communities in seven states from Washington to Springfield. Millions of people came out over two weeks to see the passing funeral train. At a dozen scheduled stops, the coffin was transported by horse-drawn hearse to public buildings, including Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where Lincoln lay in state and mourners waited for up to five hours to pass by the closed coffin. Lincoln was buried on May 4.


Today is Tuesday, 21 April 2015, and here is what’s available in terms of Daily Blogging Prompts and other related events in the genealogy blogosphere:

Items of Note

  • Today: Kindergarten Day and Lincoln Funeral Train – 150th Anniversary.

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Instant Discoveries™ Now Available for ALL MyHeritage Users!

MyHeritage has announced that Instant Discoveries™ are now available for all MyHeritage users.

[Editor’s Note: Imagine in the photo above, is is my inner genealogist doing the Genealogy Happy Dance. Why? Here is some HUGE news from our sponsor, MyHeritage – Instant Discoveries™ is a great way to connect with other users and to make progress on building your family tree at MyHeritage!]

We’re delighted to announce that Instant Discoveries™ are now available for all MyHeritage users. Launched in December 2014, Instant Discoveries™ is a unique experience for discovering family history information and applying it to one’s tree on MyHeritage with ease. Initially we released this experience only for new users – newcomers to family history – to make it easier for them to embark on their family history journey. By signing up at MyHeritage and entering some basic information about immediate family members, new users discovered ancestors, relatives and never-seen-before photos in just a few seconds. Following the successful launch we took Instant Discoveries™ to the streets of New York and demonstrated it to passers-by. It was incredible to see their emotional reactions.

As of this week, we’ve taken this breakthrough technology to the next level, by providing the Instant Discoveries™ experience to all users of MyHeritage, enabling multiple individuals and photos to be added to existing family trees in just a few clicks.

How does it work?

An Instant Discovery™ is a “package” of family history information that you can apply in one click. If an individual in your family tree connects to a branch in another family tree, you’ll be alerted about this and can then choose to add everyone in that branch (up to 40-50 people) to your tree, who is not already there, in one go, rather than manually add people one by one, and amend the data piece by piece.

Every Instant Discovery™ is based on a match, which is found by our Smart Matching™ technology, and we filter out incorrect matches automatically. Instant Discoveries™ complement Smart Matches™ in how the information is applied to the user’s tree. With Smart Matches™, information is added to the tree one fact at a time, one person at a time, manually. With Instant Discoveries™ an entire branch can be copied in a single click, along with all facts, events and photos, and source citations are automatically created in the target tree to document exactly where the data came from. To protect the privacy of other users, Instant Discoveries™ never bring information on living people.

We’ve already processed millions of family trees on MyHeritage for Discoveries out of the 28 million existing trees added by our users, and found that more than 50% of the trees will enjoy one or more Discoveries! The success rate increases as your tree grows (for example, a tree with 100 individuals will enjoy at least one Discovery almost always, and often many more). Even if your tree isn’t growing, the success rate will still increase each day as MyHeritage adds millions of records and profiles every day, collecting more data to compare against your tree.

World map of Discoveries

MyHeritage users around the world have already begun enjoying Discoveries and adding them to their trees. To get a feel for the great things people are discovering, we’ve created a fun interactive map, showing the users making Discoveries on MyHeritage around the world, almost in real-time. Click the image below to view the interactive map.

For more information on Instant Discoveries and other great features at MyHeritage, click here to continue reading . . .

©2015, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.

May I Introduce to You . . . Anne Young

 

Come meet genealogy blogger Anne Young, author of Anne's Family History and Avoca During World War I, in this interview by Wendy Mathias at GeneaBloggers.

I have the pleasure of introducing to you Anne Young and her two blogs, Anne’s Family History and Avoca During World War I. In her family blog, Anne strives to “add definition and colour to some of the events in [her] family’s history beyond mere names, dates and places.” The high level of research accompanied by photos and documents that readers admire in her family blog continues in her new blog recording the history of Avoca, a small town in the goldfields of Victoria, Australia.  Anne is also a regular contributor to the Worldwide Genealogy Blog.

A Little About Anne

“I was born in Adelaide, South Australia, and grew up in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. A few years ago we moved to Ballarat, 100 km (70 miles) north-west of Melbourne, Victoria. My ancestors and my husband’s came to the Ballarat district in the mid nineteenth century.”

How Anne Got Started in Genealogy

“My father, his grandfather and other members of his family have been interested in their family history. Because to some degree my family history had been documented but nothing had been researched on my husband’s side, I concentrated first on my husband’s forebears. I started my research in the very early 90s when my children were small.”

Anne’s Thoughts About Blogging

“I started my blog in 2012. I wanted to write about some of the details of our forebears’ lives and make sense of some of the sources beyond merely recording facts and dates on a family tree. There is a great amount of primary material to understand. The explosion of digitized records and the digitization of newspapers have made a wealth of information easily accessible.

“My blog is a record for my children and any others who may be interested in our family stories. My children do actually read my blog :) so it is a good way for me to pass on family history.”

Anne’s Advice to New Bloggers

“Just start writing! Don’t over complicate the story. You don’t have to tell somebody’s whole life story in a blog post; just an incident from their life can be interesting. I find newspaper articles very useful as a starting point for a post. I also enjoy the themes posted by the Sepia Saturday blogging team. I also enjoyed the self-imposed task of writing for 26 days in April set by the A to Z Challenge. This year I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors challenge.

“Suggestions for posts come from other Bloggers. Last year I wrote about immigration in response to a meme proposed by fellow blogger Pauleen Cass.”

Anne’s Favorite Blog Posts

Australia Day:  Climbing Our Family’s Gum Tree, the story of Anne’s immigrant ancestors

Anne’s Time with Ancestors

“For all my blog posts I review and extend the research I have already done. This may take at least a day and sometimes more than a week. I now do research for other people and can get very busy on research on other people’s family trees.”

What Anne Loves Most About Genealogy

“Constructing the tree is like working on a jigsaw puzzle, and I enjoy working out who is related to whom, and discovering more about who they were and what they did.”

* * *

Please take a moment to visit Anne at Anne’s Family History and leave her a comment letting her know you stopped by. Thank-you, Anne, for letting us inside your blogging world.

© 2015, copyright Wendy Mathias. All rights reserved.

Wendy Mathias is a retired teacher who divides her time between her home in Chesapeake, Virginia and Smith Mountain Lake.  She enjoys researching her family and digging for the story behind old family photos for her blog Jollett Etc. Are you a genealogy blogger who would like to be interviewed for the “May I Introduce To You . . .” series? If so, contact Wendy via email wendymath@cox.net.